“I think people are afraid to poke fun at things on a public scale unless they’re getting paid a lot of money, and even then, they’re not good at it… It’s not that difficult to do it.”
“It would be really cool if girls had a more fearless attitude because girls are encouraged to be timid and polite and they’re scared to negotiate… And the media is making women feel shit about themselves so they can sell products. It’s the way the world is structured.”

Australian Power Couple Ditches High Life of Partying to Live in a Van

It was an unbearably hot afternoon when Bessie Bardot and Geoff Barker finally broke down and placed the Craigslist ad. They’d planned to camp over the Fourth of July weekend in the Westfield Century City mall parking garage, but their cargo van was too tall to fit in the structure. They’d been circling the streets of Beverly Hills for hours.

In the five years they’d spent exploring the world in a van with daughter BlueBelle, they had never been so desperate.

Tabloid fixtures and reality television stars in their native Australia, Bardot and Barker had arrived in the United States as part of an experiment: What would happen when they gave away all of their possessions and hit the road with baby BlueBelle, two suitcases and no plans whatsoever?

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Banksy’s “Haight Street Rat” at the U.S. Bank Tower: This Is Where I Draw the Line

“This’ll look nice when it’s framed” read one of the massive pieces of satiric graffiti Banksy painted on public walls across San Francisco in April 2010. Brian Greif, a retired television executive turned art preservationist, must’ve thought the same thing when he raised more than $10,000 on Kickstarter to professionally remove and frame one of the few Banksy pieces in San Francisco that hadn’t been immediately vandalized or whitewashed. 

Named the Haight Street Rat for its placement atop a Victorian building on Haight Street, the stenciled rat clutching a red marker is now neatly framed and displayed (until Nov. 28) in a location entirely unlike the one in which it was created: the lobby of the U.S. Bank Tower in downtown L.A., the city’s tallest tower and perhaps its most conspicuous symbol of capitalism

Your own personal Jesus. (at Rainbow Bar and Grill)

How a Tiny Hamster Became a YouTube Celebrity

On a Friday afternoon in late August, Joel Jensen and Joe Matsushima are setting up a hot dog–eating competition in a soundstage on the 41,000-square-foot campus of YouTube Space L.A. The massive Playa Vista compound (seven stages, 10 editing suites, a 47-seat screening room) is offered at no cost to YouTube channels with at least 10,000 subscribers. With more than 75,000, HelloDenizen is a shoo-in.

The channel owes most of its subscribers to an 83-second video whose plot doesn’t stray far from the title: “Tiny Hamsters Eating Tiny Burritos.” Uploaded to HelloDenizen’s channel in April, it has been viewed more than 8 million times.

I. Twin Palms
II. Neither Dollies Nor Pull Carts 
III. Permanent Gang Injunction
All photos by Jenn Swann I. Twin Palms
II. Neither Dollies Nor Pull Carts 
III. Permanent Gang Injunction
All photos by Jenn Swann I. Twin Palms
II. Neither Dollies Nor Pull Carts 
III. Permanent Gang Injunction
All photos by Jenn Swann

I. Twin Palms

II. Neither Dollies Nor Pull Carts 

III. Permanent Gang Injunction

All photos by Jenn Swann

In the 70s, an architect thought it’d be super clever to design this apartment building after a roll of film